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Future Homeschool Teachers | Homeschooling Girls Day 4

If you’re homeschooling girls, chances are you’ve considered that you might be raising future homeschool teachers.

Perhaps, if you’re like me, you imagine your grandchildren learning at home, under the careful tutelage of their mom, your daughter. You see them crawling into her lap to listen to one of your favorite stories. You see your daughter sitting at your house, sipping tea, asking for curriculum advice. Maybe you even get a little teary-eyed thinking about it. Maybe, to increase the likelihood of this little scene taking place, you find yourself dropping little hints like, “you’re going to be such a good teacher someday!”

On the other hand, maybe you never do such underhanded things and your kids will never need therapy like mine will.

Well good for you. No need to be smug about it now.

Anyway. Whether you gaze a little too often into the future, or you’ve never given it a second thought, you have to admit that your daughters might one day be homeschool moms themselves.

Our girls can take home economics, sewing, even child development. Why not teach how to homeschool?

Here is a little of what you can share through the ages.

Elementary School: Why do You Homeschool?

When your girls are younger, remind them often why you homeschool. Keep it simple! This is probably something you’re already doing. If you’re not sure, then ask your girls why they think you homeschool. If nothing else, you’ll probably get some cute answers. If they’re not sure, then share with them some of your reasons.

Take advantage of opportunities to share some of the kid-friendly benefits of homeschooling as they come up. Enjoying a field trip or spur-of-the-moment project? Have a late night and start school a little later than usual? Bring school with you to grandma’s house? How many times a week do we find ourselves thinking, “Wow, I never did this in school!” or “Wow, these kids wouldn’t have been able to do this if they had to go to school today!”

We know the benefits go far beyond the fun stuff, but make sure your kids are aware of the fun stuff, too. Above all else, your kids should know that homeschooling is fun!

Middle School: What is Your Approach?

Once your kids are a little older, you can begin to talk to them about the approach or methods you use. My girls love when my husband and I come home from our homeschool convention and bust out all of the new materials we’ve bought. It’s a great opportunity to talk about different approaches and techniques.

It’s not too early to start talking about learning styles and philosophies, too.I never sat down and had a “Homeschooling 101” class with my ninth grader, Coco, but she’s gleaned quite a bit over the last three years.

She knows why we use what math we use and why we use a different math with her little sister. These are things that just come up naturally. She has been involved in the choosing of some aspects of her curriculum for the last couple of years. Coming from private school to homeschool in seventh grade, she has learned firsthand the difference between a textbook approach and a literature-based approach. She sees me giving her sister copywork and dictation instead of weekly spelling tests, and we’ve talked about the difference in that, too.

Of course, we are a very talkative family with a very hyper mom who loves all things homeschool, and things might not come up as naturally or as often for some calm, laid-back types. If that’s the case, then seek those opportunities out to give your middle school girls a little insight into why you use what you use.

And rest assured, my kids have no idea who Charlotte Mason and Susan Wise-Bauer are. What I am talking about is sharing little bits of your philosophy of education here and there. We don’t sit around and have in-depth discussions about it all. (Though I would be secretly thrilled if we did.)

High School and Beyond: How Do You Homeschool?

As your daughter gets ready to graduate, it might be the time for a Homeschooling 101 Class. I have not done this myself, as my oldest is in ninth grade.

However, as I am teaching her to keep a cleaning schedule for a home, shop and prepare meals for a family, sew a button on a shirt, and diaper a baby, I’ll be teaching her the nuts and bolts of homeschooling.

And how will I teach her this? The same way we’ll learn all those other things… by doing it!

Here is a short list of tasks you can help your high schooler work on. Depending on how interested your daughter is, you can either give her a few short lessons or work elbow to elbow all year long as she practically becomes your teacher’s assistant in her senior year. Sorry, there I go fantasizing again.

Creating a lesson plan
Presenting a lesson to a younger sibling
Grading papers
Reading aloud
Choosing a course of study
Designing a unit study
Creating a schedule
Giving a dictation or spelling test
Giving a hands-on math lesson
Helping occupy younger siblings during lessons

Pretty much anything you do as a homeschool mom!

Will you raise your girl to be a future homeschool mom?

Linking to Helpful Homeschool Hints

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Be sure to visit these brilliant women in this 10 days adventure between February 7th-18th! We love these ladies and we know you do too.

10 days of socialization for mom | The Homeschool Chick
10 days of classical education | Milk & Cookies
10 days of large families | Chocolate on My Cranium
10 days of special needs | Special Needs Homeschooling
10 days of struggling learners | Homeschooling the Chaotic Family
10 days of homeschooling girls | Homegrown Mom
10 days of homeschool enrichment | Confessions of a Homeschooler
10 days of building a spiritual legacy | Mommy Missions
10 days of frugal homeschooling |The Happy Housewife
10 days of Charlotte Mason | Our Journey Westward
10 days of unschooling | Homeschooling Belle
10 days of organization | Confessions of an Organized Homeschool Mom
10 days of getting started | Blog, She Wrote
10 days of homeschooling boys | The Tie That Binds Us
10 days of homeschooling Montessori | Fruit in Season
10 days of preschool | Delightful Learning

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Mother Daughter Purity Retreat | Homeschooling Girls day 3


I first heard the idea of planning a mother-daughter purity retreat at a homeschool convention last year, and I knew right away it was something I wanted to do with my girls.

What is a Purity Retreat?

A purity retreat is a one-on-one weekend away with your daughter to have “the talk,” (you know that talk) learn about God’s standard for purity and marriage, and set boundaries for future relationships. Of course, that is just part of it. The other part is awesome fun and bonding time with your girl!

Preparing for Your Purity Retreat

Materials Needed

Essential for this particular retreat is the Passport2Purity® Getaway Kit. Or, you can purchase the older edition I used for just $13 at Amazon. *a $25 savings. Consider it an investment either way. You can use this with all of your children, just purchasing a new journal for each one.

What I love most about these CD’s is, all the work is done for you! You don’t need to decide which subjects you’ll cover, and you don’t need to worry that you’ll leave out something important during the talks. Dennis and Barbara Rainey cover it all. And, yes, we found ourselves blushing a few times listening to them! This set works for dads and boys, too, by the way.

The CD’s are geared towards 12 year olds, but I went with my 14 year old and we thoroughly enjoyed each lesson. If you have the opportunity, I would recommend going with your 12 year old. Don’t let her age hold you back, though, if she’s older. It’s never too late! Some of the lessons might be on the young side, but you can just go into further depth if needed.

In addition to the CD’s, you’ll receive a workbook for your girl, a parent’s guide, a passport, and stickers. The parent’s guide is invaluable. It includes checklists for materials you’ll need, suggestions for fun times, and great insight for Mom. The passport you fill in with stickers as you complete the lessons.

Questions to Discuss Beforehand

I went through the materials the weekend before we left, and in retrospect, I wish I would have discussed a couple of things with my husband before we left. It might seem obvious, but there were some questions that came up that I hadn’t given enough thought to. Some my daughter and I worked through together, but some we left open-ended because I hadn’t established a for-sure plan with my husband.

Will your daughter date or will you follow a courtship model? At what age will you allow romantic relationships? What physical boundaries do you find appropriate?

Before You Leave

Before you leave, you’ll want to do the following:

Pray! Pray while you’re preparing, while you’re packing, while you’re planning your fun. While you’re at it, recruit a couple people to pray for you, too.

Reserve a place to stay. We found a very nice hotel near a large shopping mall, which would prove convenient for our fun activity. There are many suggestions in the parent guide if you can’t afford a hotel room.

Plan your fun activity. You’ll find more information about this in your guide, including a comprehensive list of ideas. I chose shopping for our activity. Our retreat coincided with Coco’s birthday and she had money to spend on clothes shopping. That might not appeal to some, but it was perfect for us. We definitely bond over shopping. We also hit up Sephora and Coco got a makeover. Too fun!

Think about ones you’ll leave behind. My little one, Soleil, was 7 and though she understood that her turn would come, I wanted her to feel special, too. I wrote her a note and told her how I was looking forward to our time away someday and included a couple little goofy inside jokes we have. I also left her some of her favorite candy since I’d bought some junk food for the trip. She still has this note hanging in her room, it meant so much to her. I also wrote my husband a note, thanking him for providing the money and staying home so we could do this.

Go shopping for materials.
The object lessons mostly require household items, so I just had to get a couple of things like puzzles and a balloon. I also got some of our favorite junky snacks to enjoy.

Write in your daughter’s book. There is a place for you and your husband to write letters to your daughter in her book. Priceless.

Consider a gift. The book talks about the importance of a gift and how it is a visual memory of your time together for a long time afterward. A purity ring is suggested, but it was important to us that my husband be there when we gave her that. When I was out getting materials, I found a necklace with two hearts that said, Mother and daughter, friends forever. I gave this to Coco at our dinner and she still wears it all the time. While an added gift wasn’t necessary, it was definitely special. There is a list of more gift ideas in the book.

Invite your daughter! We gave Coco the retreat as part of her birthday gift. I made her an invitation and wrapped it up, along with her passport to add to the excitement.

During the Retreat

Object Lessons

There are a few hands-on object lessons included in the workbook. I strongly recommend doing these lessons, they are simple and leave a lasting memory of the subjects covered. My daughter and I just revisited one the other day, when we talked about a certain singer bouncing back and forth between highly publicized relationships. We spoke about how part of each person will be with her forever, and remembered a certain project involving nothing but glue and construction paper.

That lesson took a few moments, yet the point is burned in her brain forever.

Celebration Dinner

Coco and I had our celebration dinner at Rainforest Café, one of her favorite restaurants that we’ve only been to twice. I gave her the necklace, and we giggled and had some silly fun. Afterwards, we took funny photos in a photo booth outside the restaurant. Coco still has our photo strip up in her bedroom, and it’s another memory of our great weekend.

An Added Bonus

My sister-in-law Destiny had gone through a purity program as a teen, and entered her marriage to my brother with her purity saved for him. Destiny shared a letter with me that she had written at the age of 14 to her future husband, and offered to let me share it with Coco during our retreat. I have to say, this was incredibly impacting as we sat together and read her aunt’s 14 year old handwritten letter to her future husband, Coco’s uncle.

After the Retreat

I can’t decide what the best part of this experience was. Seeing Coco’s eyes well up as she read our letters to her. Talking about her future with boys and being blown away by how insightful she is. Hearing her heartfelt prayers and being so thankful my daughter knows Jesus. Staying up most of the night; chatting and giggling in our double beds, snacking on hot cheetos and sour patch kids. Walking around the mall, giggling and giddy, exhausted from staying up all night.

Seeing my daughter as a beautiful young woman that will one day make a lovely wife for some blessed man.

Lots of topics we covered during the retreat are things that will need to be talked about more than once. Our weekly tea time has been a great time to refresh and chat some more about these things. This isn’t a one-time discussion, it’s an ongoing dialogue that will last throughout her teens and up to marriage.

*Affiliate link. I am not associated with Passport to Purity, and they do not know I am writing this review. However, if you purchase this from my Amazon link, you’ll be supporting this site. :)

Have you considered a purity retreat with your daughter?

Be sure to visit these brilliant women in this 10 days adventure between February 7th-18th! We love these ladies and we know you do too.

10 days of socialization for mom | The Homeschool Chick
10 days of classical education | Milk & Cookies
10 days of large families | Chocolate on My Cranium
10 days of special needs | Special Needs Homeschooling
10 days of struggling learners | Homeschooling the Chaotic Family
10 days of homeschooling girls | Homegrown Mom
10 days of homeschool enrichment | Confessions of a Homeschooler
10 days of building a spiritual legacy | Mommy Missions
10 days of frugal homeschooling |The Happy Housewife
10 days of Charlotte Mason | Our Journey Westward
10 days of unschooling | Homeschooling Belle
10 days of organization | Confessions of an Organized Homeschool Mom
10 days of getting started | Blog, She Wrote
10 days of homeschooling boys | The Tie That Binds Us
10 days of homeschooling Montessori | Fruit in Season
10 days of preschool | Delightful Learning

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Girly Workboxes | Homeschooling Girls Day 2


source: photoxpress

I am a huge fan of workboxes, and it’s no secret that my favorite ones are the “fun” ones I get to fill each day for my girls.

In the fun boxes, I put things that are educational in some sense, but not traditional school work. I had some fun coming up with this list of super-girly workbox fillers for you, and I can’t wait to use some of these ideas myself. Some of these came from our own workbox experience, but most I got from simply opening our cabinets and going through my girls’ bedrooms :)

(Of course, many of these would work for boys, too, but this series is called Homeschooling Girls so I’m going to stay on that note.)

Workbox Fillers for Girls

Language Arts

Magazines (we like American Girl and Revolve Bible Magazine)
Blank cards or stationery and a colored pen for letter writing
Magnetic Poetry
Journal
An Acrostic poem for her to complete. Use her name, a color, animal, or other word that will pique her interest.

Math / Fine Motor

Lincoln Logs, Legos
Marbles
Jacks
Tangrams
Puzzles
Her own lap chalkboard with a couple math or grammar problems on it and some chalk.
Toy cash register or calculator, fake money, and a note telling her you’ll play store with her.

Active Play

Jump Rope
Sidewalk chalk to play hopscotch with
An active Wii game
An upbeat CD and a card telling her to make up a dance

Arts and Crafts

Knitting needles and yarn
Needle, thread, buttons, fabric
Watercolor paints
Stencils
Scrapbook page to decorate
Sticker book
Paper Dolls
A Ziploc bag of collage items, a sheet of cardstock, and some heavy glue (think sequins, feathers, glitter, pom poms, googly eyes, stickers, etc.)
Flower, leaf, or stone with a sketchpad, colored pencils
Ingredients to make her own art supplies with mom.

More Workbox Fun

Recipe card
A baby doll, diaper, and change of clothes. If you have one of those dolls you can feed, even better!
Nail polish, file and clippers
Rainbow Face Painting Kit

Printables on Homeschool Share

Fruit Loop Graph
Dress Logic Cards
Flower pot addition
Dog Math Cards

More on Workboxes

Here you can find a workbox planning sheet I’ve used.
Sneaking chores into workboxes
More workbox fillers.

Do you have some more girly workbox ideas?

Keep up with 10 days of homeschooling girls and get regular updates by email here. Or, subscribe to the RSS Feed here.

Be sure to visit these brilliant women in this 10 days adventure between February 7th-18th! We love these ladies and we know you do too.

10 days of socialization for mom | The Homeschool Chick
10 days of classical education | Milk & Cookies
10 days of large families | Chocolate on My Cranium
10 days of special needs | Special Needs Homeschooling
10 days of struggling learners | Homeschooling the Chaotic Family
10 days of homeschooling girls | Homegrown Mom
10 days of homeschool enrichment | Confessions of a Homeschooler
10 days of building a spiritual legacy | Mommy Missions
10 days of frugal homeschooling |The Happy Housewife
10 days of Charlotte Mason | Our Journey Westward
10 days of unschooling | Homeschooling Belle
10 days of organization | Confessions of an Organized Homeschool Mom
10 days of getting started | Blog, She Wrote
10 days of homeschooling boys | The Tie That Binds Us
10 days of homeschooling Montessori | Fruit in Season
10 days of preschool | Delightful Learning

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Morning Routines |Homeschooling Girls Day 1


source: free digital photos

If there was one thing that could make or break our homeschool day, it would be our morning routines. On days when we start school lazily, and wander around listlessly, just kind of easing into our work with no direction… well you can guess how those days turn out.

However, when we all spend about thirty minutes getting ready for our day, and doing what I refer to as our Morning Routine, then our whole day seems to go more smoothly. We actually have a couple of different morning routines. One is what we each do on our own before we come together to start school, and the other is what we do together at the beginning of our “school hours.” We call that our Morning Mingle, and I’ll share a bit about that later in this post.

How to Get a Regular Morning Routine Started

One word: Checklists! Even a three year old can be sent to her room with a list of three things to do. My girls each have a list of things I want to be sure they do each morning.

The nice thing about a checklist is I don’t spend an hour nagging them every day. Did you brush your teeth? Did you have your quiet time? Not that I have to nag my 14 year old very much anymore, but a list is still helpful for keeping her on track.

What to Include in Your Morning Routines

Our lists don’t change much. I might switch up the chores, but the basics stay pretty much the same.

  • Quiet Time (read the Bible and pray)
  • Brush Teeth
  • Brush Hair
  • Wash Face
  • Make Bed
  • Straighten Bedroom
  • Get Dressed. (This is actually optional if we’re home all day. I really don’t care anymore if we’re doing school in pajamas.)
  • Wipe down bathroom counters and sinks, empty dishwasher, or other small chore.
  • Decide When to do Your Morning Routines

    Sometimes I tell the girls at night that I want them downstairs for breakfast at a specific time, with their routines done. More often, though, we eat breakfast and then do our routines. This is nice for those days when we don’t have anywhere to be and it gives me at least thirty minutes to get my day in order and catch up on anything I didn’t do before breakfast. (Which might be my favorite thing about our morning routines!)

    During busy seasons of life, I am more likely to require things be done by a certain time. When we’re enjoying more relaxed days, I simply ask them to get started on their routines after breakfast and then meet me in the school room. They’ve learned that the quicker they get finished, the quicker we start school, which means the earlier we end school… resulting in more free afternoon time.

    Not that they always jump up and get going.

    Morning Mingle

    Once we come together, teeth brushed and beds made, we have what we call our Morning Mingle. This is simply fifteen minutes or so together in which we pray, read scripture, and listen to a poem or do a picture study.

    During this time, I’ll let the girls know if we’re doing anything at a specific time that day. Sometimes I’ll tell them to be ready for art by 3pm, or we’ll schedule a workout or tea times. I like doing this day by day, as we’re more likely to work things in that way. I’ll write whatever we’ve planned in the corner of our whiteboard, and that keeps me accountable to actually do it. Otherwise, I might plan to do art all year long with the girls and never quite get around to doing it.

    Just so you know, we don’t always have our Morning Mingle. Some days the girls are done getting ready at different times, so we kind of just ease into our day.

    How do your mornings go?

    Keep up with 10 days of homeschooling girls and get regular updates by email here. Or, subscribe to the RSS Feed here.

    Linking to WFMW

    Be sure to visit these brilliant women in this 10 days adventure between February 7th-18th! We love these ladies and we know you do too.

    10 days of socialization for mom | The Homeschool Chick
    10 days of classical education | Milk & Cookies
    10 days of large families | Chocolate on My Cranium
    10 days of special needs | Special Needs Homeschooling
    10 days of struggling learners | Homeschooling the Chaotic Family
    10 days of homeschooling girls | Homegrown Mom
    10 days of homeschool enrichment | Confessions of a Homeschooler
    10 days of building a spiritual legacy | Mommy Missions
    10 days of frugal homeschooling |The Happy Housewife
    10 days of Charlotte Mason | Our Journey Westward
    10 days of unschooling | Homeschooling Belle
    10 days of organization | Confessions of an Organized Homeschool Mom
    10 days of getting started | Blog, She Wrote
    10 days of homeschooling boys | The Tie That Binds Us
    10 days of homeschooling Montessori | Fruit in Season
    10 days of preschool | Delightful Learning

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    10 Days of Homeschooling Girls

    I am super excited to let you know that starting Feb. 7th, I will be doing a 10 Day series on Homeschooling Girls! I’m going to be part of a Blog Hop put on by Heart of the Matter.

    I’ve got ten post ideas outlined, but there is definitely some wiggle room, so let me know if you have any suggestions or requests for posts on homeschooling girls.

    Check out all the blogs joining in the fun. I’m in great company!

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